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Cold War Figure Project

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In Global Studies, our Outdoor School students, grades 6-8, are working on a new project. As the class progressed through World War II and into the Cold War, the teachers put greater responsibility on the students. They were asked to learn about the Cold War through the lens of major figures of the times. Students were given the opportunity to choose the person wanted to study. The picked one person from this list:

Harry S. Truman
Dwight D. Eisenhower
Hubert Humphrey
Fidel Castro
The Rosenbergs
John F. Kennedy
Nikita Khrushchev
Joseph Stalin
Paul Robeson
Curtis LeMay
Douglass MacArthur
Joseph McCarthy

During our study of WWII, we introduced the idea of political ideology and the political spectrum. Students were given a picture of the historical figure they selected; they were asked to do some research and gather data on their person. Once the research was completed they were instructed to add the facts they gathered on a spectrum. Now, they will be doing the same for historical figures the emerged during the Cold War.

Cold War Figure Project

In this project, students will:(1) Research and present their findings on their Cold War figure to the class. Students have the freedom to choose their medium for presenting. They may choose to write an essay, create a stop motion animation, write and illustrate a comic book, compose an article, or come up with a new medium for presenting their findings. Each student has been given a list of research questions that will help them conduct their research.

Students are expected to provide a general background on the person (Were they a president? an activist? a government official?), their contributions to the Cold War, dates of important events they were a part of, and their political ideology. Students are expected in include sources.

(2) A short, written summary of their figure and their involvement in the Cold War (2-3 sentences).

(3) A visual representation of their figure in the form of a painting, a collage, a drawing or any other visual form that has been approved by a Teacher/Researcher.

With their short summaries and visual representations students will re-create the political spectrum that we created in earlier classes. The spectrum will be displayed during our next Showcase Museum.

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